Books

PLEASE NOTE: In some cases I’ve written personal comments plus a little more about those books with the colored fonts. You may click on the titles to learn more about each. When you finish, close the page and you’ll be returned automatically to this list. In time I hope to add many more.

Many are old and read years ago. Should you be interested in any, they may or may not be available in libraries, or for sale in bookstores. Others–even those out of print–are usually available for purchase online. (I’ve had good luck at Amazon.com at prices of one penny on up, with a median range of 1.99 plus postage of about $3.99 per book.)

FICTION:

  1. A Fine and Private Place by Peter S. Beagle
  2. The Death of Vishnu, by Manil Suri
  3. Middlesex, by Jeffrey Eugenides

NON-FICTION:

  1. The Legend of Nance Dude, by Maurice Stanley
  2. Two Under the Indian Sun, by Jon and Rumer Godden
  3. A Place Called SWEET APPLE, by Celestine Sibley
  4. All Over but the Shoutin’, by Rick Bragg
  5. Dry, by Augustin Burroughs

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND PICTURE BOOKS:

  1. A Light in the Attic, by Shel Silverstein, Harper & Row, 1981
  2. Where the Sidewalk Ends, by Shel Silverstein, Harper & Row, 1974
  3. Missing May, by Cynthia Ryland, Orchard Books, 1992 (won the Newberry Medal for writing, as well as 1992 Boston Globe Hornc Book Award for fiction)
  4. Brown Angels, an album of pictures and verse by Walter Dean Myers, Harper-Collins Publishers, 1993
  5. Politically Correct, the ultimate storybook, by James Finn Garner, McMillan Books, 1994
  6. Shabanu, Daughter of the Wind, by Suzanne Fisher Staples, Knopt, 1989
  7. Walter the Lazy Mouse, by Majorie Flack, Xerox Education Publications, in the 1970s

2 thoughts on “Books

  1. I stumbled upon your blog and wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed it. I have an “elder blog” and hope you’ll drop by sometime soon. Blessings, Barbara

  2. I’m glad you stumbled in, Barbara. And I really appreciate your taking the time and effort to leave a comment. I will definitely visit you on your elderblog very soon. As we say in the south where I grew up, “y’all come back now!”

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